Menu
A+ A A-

Welcome to the University of Michigan site—where faculty and staff showcase their expertise by providing a synopis of their books. If you are U-M faculty or staff, please feel free to submit information about your book.

 


 

Self Defense: Steps to Survival

Self Defense: Steps to Survival

Self-defense is often misunderstood as merely physical techniques like martial arts. Mattingly teaches that effective violence prevention requires not just physical methods, but verbal, emotional and social skills that are teachable and accessible. In addition to offering a wide range of physical defenses, Self-Defense: Steps to Survival teaches students to identify danger, recognize warning signs of violence in an intimate relationship, and to defend themselves and others against abuse in a variety of situations. Lessons are cumulative and self-paced, and based on proven strategies and techniques taught on campuses and in metropolitan areas worldwide. This book is dedicated to everyone who was ever violated and didn’t fight back – because you didn’t know how, you were scared, you thought you’d be hurt worse, or you thought it was your fault. It wasn’t your fault. It’s important that you survived. And it’s safe to learn how to resist now. No one deserves to be sexually assaulted. No one ever asks for or causes assault. People aren’t attacked because they ‘did something wrong’ or made a poor choice. Most assailants are known by their victims and plan their attacks far in advance. Knowing this, you can learn to defend yourself. Hone your senses, deepen your awareness, and learn the techniques that could save your life.

Authors:

  • Katy Mattingly, Division of Student Affairs


Related Links:

Crooked Line: From Cultural History to the History of Society

Crooked Line: From Cultural History to the History of Society

"Eley brilliantly probes transformations in the historians' craft over the past four decades. I found A Crooked Line engrossing, insightful, and inspiring." --Lizabeth Cohen, author of A Consumers' Republic

"A Crooked Line brilliantly captures the most significant shifts in the landscape of historical scholarship that have occurred in the last four decades. Part personal history, part insightful analysis of key methodological and theoretical historiographical tendencies since the late 1960s, always thoughtful and provocative, Eley's book shows us why history matters to him and why it should also matter to us." --Robert Moeller, University of California, Irvine

"Part genealogy, part diagnosis, part memoir, Eley's account of the histories of social and cultural history is a tour de force." --Antoinette Burton, Professor of History and Catherine C. and Bruce A. Bastian Professor of Global and Transnational Studies, University of Illinois

Authors:

  • Geoff Eley, Karl Pohrt Distinguished University Professor of Contemporary History, Chair and Professor of History, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Related Links:

Dead Lovers: Erotic Bonds and the Study of Premodern Europe

Dead Lovers: Erotic Bonds and the Study of Premodern Europe

From Eurydice to Laura and beyond, dead lovers call forth powerful expressions of grief, sorrow, love, and longing. They occasion mourning and other rituals and seem to be intrinsically bound up with changing ideas of subjecthood itself. Dead Lovers explores the complex attachments to the figure of the dead lover in Western literature, art, and other forms of cultural expression from classical antiquity through the Middle Ages and into the early modern period. By reflecting on the study of dead lovers, these essays also trace the development of themes and claims relating to our own investment in a “dead” but eroticized past that we seek to recover. The collection offers a sustained discussion of how scholarly interest in the representation of loss and erotic bonds raises pressing questions about nostalgia, performance, the role of affect in intellectual work, and the gendered cultural values that script the description and experience of the erotic.

Authors:

  • Basil Dufallo, Assistant Professor of Classical Studies and Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts

Related Links: