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412 MAYNARD STREET
ANN ARBOR, MI
48109-1399
PHONE: (734)764-7260
FAX: (734) 764-7084

Oct. 6, 2004

 

EVENT ANNOUNCEMENT
Science is fascinating: Fall 2004 Saturday Morning Physics schedule

DATE: The following Saturday mornings, 10:30-11:30 a.m.:

Oct.16, 23, 30

Nov. 6, 13, 20

Dec. 4, 11, 18

EVENT: Saturday Morning Physics series of multimedia cutting-edge science talks for general audiences. The talks are free and open to the public. High school students are especially encouraged to attend, but those of all ages are welcome.

Selected telecasts of past lectures will be available on University of Michigan educational access TV, Comcast cable channel 22 in the Ann Arbor area. The schedule is on the channel 22 web site, http://www.itcom.itd.umich.edu/umtv/. Select past lectures also continue to be telecast on the city of Ann Arbor Community Television Network's (CTN) CitiTV cable channel 19.

PLACE: 170 Dennison Building, 501 E. University Avenue, U-M Central Campus, map: http://www.umich.edu/news/ccamp.html

SPONSOR: The fall Saturday Morning Physics series is sponsored by the University of Michigan Physics Department, the Dr. M. Lois Tiffany endowment and gifts from friends of the program.

CONTACT: (734) 764-4437

WEB LINKS: For detailed descriptions of each talk, please go to the U-M Physics Department website, http://www.physics.lsa.umich.edu/nea/smp.

 

THE SCHEDULE:

Paul Haljan, U-M Physics Department

Quantum Weirdness, Quantum Tornadoes & Quantum Computers

Oct.16: The Coolest Place in the Universe

Oct. 23: Quantum Tornadoes & Bose-Einstein Condensates

Oct. 30: Quantum Computing with Cold Atoms

Michigan physicists push the very limits of quantum mechanics as they use an atomic refrigerator to create the ultra-cold, microscopic systems that are essential for a quantum computer.

* * * * * *

Dan Levin, U-M Physics Department

Heff Heff! A Herrible Higgsalump!

Nov. 6: A Particle Physicist's Toolbox

Nov. 13: In Which a Clever Trap is Set to Capture a Higgs

Particle physicists crack subatomic matter using tools that have evolved over many decades. We'll open the toolbox and explore its contents, particularly the giant detector called ATLAS that represents our best chance to find the elusive Higgs boson.

* * * * * *

Dan Amidei, U-M Physics Department

The Future of Particle Physics

Nov. 20

A leading high-energy physicist explores the connection between the heart of the proton and the origin of the universe as we peer into the future of accelerators imagining the particle physics of tomorrow.

* * * * * *

Rhonda Dzakpasu, U-M Physics Department

Probing Murky Gray Matter: Physics of the Brain

Dec. 4: What is Memory?

Dec.11: Can You See a Thought?

Dec. 18: Fired Neurons and Brain Oscillations

Michigan scientists use novel methods to study the anatomy and function of the brain in a drive to understand the neural mechanisms by which humans perceive and store information.

Contact: Carol Rabuck
Phone: (734) 763-2588
E-mail: crabuck@umich.edu